SIGCSE Student Research Competition 2005

Sponsor: SIGCSE

2005 - Graduate Division
Jane Tougas
Dalhousie University


Amala Rajan
Middlesex University


Kulsesh Shanmugasundaram
Polytechnic University


2005 - Undergraduate Division
Kamil Wnuk
Harvey Mudd College

Melissa Gifford
Hope College

Brian Vysocky
Fichtburg University


 
  OOPSLA Student Research Competition 2004

Sponsor: SIGPLAN

2004 - Graduate Division
Trevor Parsons
Dublin City University
A Framework for Detecting, Assessing and Visualizing Performance Antipatterns in Component Based Systems

Lucas Layman
North Carolina State University
Empirical Investigation of the Impact of Extreme Programming Practices on Software Projects

Tao Xie
University of Washington at Seattle
Automatic Identification of Common and Special Object-Oriented Unit Tests

2004 - Undergraduate Division
Martin Keschenau
RWTH Aachen University
Reverse Engineering of UML Specifications from Java Programs
Spiros Xanthos
University of Macedonia
Identification of Reusable Components within an Object-Oriented Software System Using Algebraic Graph Theory
Eric Bodden
RWTH Aachen University
A Lightweight LTL Runtime Verification Tool for Java

 
  SIGGRAPH Student Research Competition 2004

Sponsor: SIGGRAPH
Coordinator: Turner Whitted

2004 - Graduate Division
Morgan McGuire, Andi Fein, Colin Hartnett
Brown University
Real-Time Cartoon Rendering of Smoke
Alex Rice, Morgan McGuire, Pawel Wrotek
Brown University
Real-Time Bump Map Deformations

Leonardo Bonanni, Chia-Hsun Lee
M.I.T. Media Labratory
SmartSink: Context-Aware Work Surface


2004 - Undergraduate Division
Gabriel Taubman, Edwin Chang
Brown University
A Fast Fracture Method for Exploding Structures

David Trowbridge, Micah Dowty
University of Colorado
Mapping Chaos
 
  2004 Student Research Competition Grand Finals

Coordinator: Ann Sobel, Miami University, sobelae@muohio.edu

2004 - Graduate Division
Michael M. Swift
University of Washington
Improving the Reliability of Commodity Operating Systems
Petros Maniatis, T.J. Giuli, and Yanto Muliadi
Stanford University
Preserving Peer Replicas By Rate-Limited Sampled Voting
Xinyuan Wang
North Carolina State University
Robust Correlation of Encrypted Attack Traffic Through Stepping Stones by Watermarking the Interpacket Timing

2004 - Undergraduate Division
 
Michael Piatek
Duquesne University
Distributed Web Proxy Caching in a Local Environment
 
  SIGCSE Student Research Competition 2004

Sponsor: SIGCSE
Coordinator: Ann Sobel, Miami University, sobelae@muohio.edu

2004 - Graduate Division
Nachiappan Nagappan
North Carolina State University
Software Reliability Estimation Using Internal Code Metrics
Xinyuan Wang
North Carolina State University
Robust Correlation of Encrypted Attack Traffic through Stepping Stones by Watermarking the Interpacket Timing

Jeffrey C. Mast and Michael McFarlane
Christopher Newport University
Analysis and Processing Software for 2-D Inducer NDE SQUID Systems


2004 - Undergraduate Division
Michael Piatek
Duquesne University
Distributed Web Proxy Caching in a Local Environment
Cameron Mackenzie
Aberystwyth University
Scaffolding the Tweek Student Centred Learning Environment using Felder's Learning Styles Test

Aaron A. Waterman and Jessie Burger
The College of New Jersey
Applying Support Vector Machines to Improving Web Search Results


 
  OOPSLA Student Research Competition 2003

Sponsor: SIGPLAN
Coordinator: Torsten Layda

2003 - Graduate Division
Marat Boshernitsan
University of California - Berkeley
Program manipulation via interactive transformations
Aditya Agrawal
Vanderbilt University
Metamodel based model transformation language

Ada Diaconescu
Dublin City University
A framework for using component redundancy for self-adapting and self-optimising component-based enterprise systems


 
  Symposium on Operating Systems Principles 2003

Sponsor: SIGOPS
Coordinator: Michael L. Scott, University of Rochester, scott@cs.rochester.edu

2003 - Graduate Division
Michael M. Swift
University of Washington
Improving the Reliability of Commodity Operating Systems
Petros Maniatis, T. J. Giuli, and Yanto Muliadi
Stanford University
Preserving Peer Replicas by Rate-Limited Sampled Voting
Samuel T. King
University of Michigan
Backtracking Intrusions
 
  2003 Student Research Competition Grand Finals

Coordinator: Ann Sobel, Miami University, sobelae@muohio.edu

2003 - Graduate Division
Andy King
University of Kent at Canterbury
Removing GC Synchronisation
Adrian Mos
Dublin City University
A Framework for Performance Management of Component Based Distributed Applications

Jing Li
University of California at Riverside
Efficient Rule-Based Haplotyping Algorithms for Pedigree Data


2003 - Undergraduate Division
Michael Piatek
Duquesne University
An Analysis of Flow Identification in QoS Systems
Alex Potanin
Victoria University of Wellington
A Tool for Ownership and Confinement Analysis of the Java Object Graph

Michael Elder
Furman University
Distributed STrategy - Oriented Recursive Messaging Systems (STORMS): A Platorm for Rapid Java-based Distributed Application Development on Beowulf-Class Supercomputers


 
  SIGCSE Student Research Competition 2003

Sponsor: SIGCSE
Coordinator: Ann Sobel, Miami University, sobelae@muohio.edu

2003 - Graduate Division
Jing Li
University of California - Riverside
Efficient Rule-Based Haplotyping Algorithms for Pedigree Data
Arwa Al-Aama
George Washington University
Vigilance in Safety Critical Monitoring Systems

Philip R. Ventura, Jr.
State University of New York at Buffalo
On the Origins of Programmers: Identifying Predictors of Success for an Objects-First CS1


2003 - Undergraduate Division
Michael D. Elder
Furman University
Distributed STrategy-Oriented Recursive Messaging Systems (STORMS): A Platform for Rapid Java-based Distributed Application Development on Beowulf-class Supercomputers
Michael Piatek
Duquesne University
An Analysis of Flow Identification in QoS Systems

Nathan Wells
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Development of the Self-Calibrating Palmer Drought Severity Index


 
  OOPSLA Student Research Competition 2002

Sponsor: SIGPLAN
Coordinator: Laurie Williams, North Carolina State University, posters@oopsla.acm.org

2002 - Graduate Division
Andy King
University of Kent at Canterbury
Removing GC Synchronisation

Adrian Mos
Dublin City University
A Framework for Performance Management of Component Based Distributed Applications


Competed as an Undergraduate
Alex Potanin
Victoria University of Wellington
A Tool for Ownership and Confinement Analysis of the Java Object Graph


 
  10th ACM International Student Research Contest 2002

Sponsors: SIGCSE and the ACM Membership Activities Board
Coordinator: Ann Sobel, Miami University, sobelae@muohio.edu

2002 - Graduate Division
Teresa Hubscher-Younger
Auburn University
Learning Algorithms through Building, Sharing and Evaluating Representations
Yong Guan, Xinwen Fu, Riccardo Bettati, and Wei Zhao
Texas A&M University
A Quantitative Analysis of Anonymous Communications

Simon Cuce
Monash University
GLOMAR: Adaptive Consistency Control for Distributed File Systems


2002 - Undergraduate Division
Ben Betz
DePauw University
v-VIS: New Methods of Passive Information Grouping in a Classroom Tool for Low Vision Students
Jeff Larkin and Winter Liu
Furman University
Design and Implementation of a High-Performance Hardware/Software Architecture to Support Data Interpretation on the NASA-TIMED Satellite
Shaun Kane, Andrew Lehman and Elizabeth Partridge
University of Massachusetts
Indexing George Washington's Handwritten Manuscripts: A Study of Word Matching Techniques
 
  9th ACM International Student Research Contest 2001

Sponsors: SIGCSE and the ACM Membership Activities Board
Coordinator: Ann Sobel, Miami University, sobelae@muohio.edu

2001 - Graduate Division
Kevin Fu
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Fast and Secure Distributed Read-Only File System
Yihan Li
Polytechnic University
Dual Round Robin Switch
Scott Pike
The Ohio State University
A Distributed Resource-Allocation Algorithm With Failure Locality 1

2001 - Undergraduate Division
Michael Elder
Furman University
The Old World Meets the New: Utilizing Java Technology to Re-vitalize and Enhance NASA Scientific Legacy Code

Abigail Walker and Jennifer Wanner from Xavier University
Prakash Ojha from Hope College
Empirical Study of Course Scheduling Methods

Shawn Craft
The Ohio State University
A New and More Efficient Implementation of an Undirected Graph Component
 
  8th ACM International Student Research Contest 2000

Sponsors: SIGCSE and the ACM Membership Activities Board
Coordinator: Ann Sobel, Miami University, sobelae@muohio.edu

2000 - Graduate Division
Debra Burhans
State University of New York at Buffalo
A Complete Characterization of Answers in Rule-Based Systems
Leonardo de Moura
PUC-Rio de Janeiro
Automating the Generation of Program Analysis and Verication Tools
Stefano Agostinelli
INFM of Genova
3D Tomographic Reconstruction ActiveX Style

2000 - Undergraduate Division
Kent Bolton
University of Kansas
Solving the Geodetic Cover Problem Through Genetic Algorithms

Sarah Waterson
The Ohio State University
Social Data Structures for Algorithm Animation

Katie Moor
Eckerd College
A Web-Centric Java-Based Simple Network Management Protocol
 
  7th ACM International Student Research Contest 1999

Sponsers: SIGCSE and the ACM Membership Activities Board
Coordinators: Ann Sobel, Miami University and Mario Guimaraes, Texas A&M - CC University, sobelae@muohio.edu

1999 - Graduate Division
Omri Traub
Harvard University
Deco: A System for Dynamic Code Optimization
Ken Samuel
University of Delaware
Extending Transformation-Based Learning to Compute Dialogue Acts
Brian Davison
Rutgers
Measuring the Performance of Prefetching Proxy Caches

1999 - Undergraduate Division
Sid Suri
University of Penn.
Solution to the Dynamic Longest Increasing Subsequence Problem

Tim McKernan and Mike Vosseller
University of Buffalo
Performance Improvements in CORBA Application

Dejan Nickolic
Michigan Tech. University
Physical Model for Cloth Movement Animation
 
  6th ACM International Student Research Contest 1998

Sponsors: SIGCSE and the ACM Membership Activities Board
Coordinator: Mario Guimaraes, Texas A&M - CC University, mariog@batman.tamucc.edu

1998 - Graduate Division
Vibhavasu Vuppala and Xipeng Xiao
Michigan State University
Scalable IP Router Architecture and Parallel Routing Table Computation
Steven R.Hansen and Daniel Schrimpsner
Auburn University
From Algorithm Animation to Animation embedded Hypermedia Visualization
Marcelo Sant'Anna
P.U.C. -  Rio de Janeiro
An Architectural Framework for Domain-Oriented Software Generators
Andrew S.Freeman
North Carolina State University
Implementing Resonant Consonants in Speech Driven Lip-Sync Animation
D'Sunte Wilson
Brown University
Hardware/Software Codesign
Balaji Santhanam, Govind Bangarbale, Justin VonHagen
Villanova University
Audible User Interface for the Visually Handicapped

1998 - Undergraduate Division

Omri Traub
Harvard University
Quality and Speed in Linear-Scan Register Allocation

Robert Schutt
Colgate University
Improving the Aliasing Artifacts Associated with Ray Tracing

Maria Jose Presso, Natalia Romero, Veronica Arganaraz
UNLP - Argentina
A formal implementation of delegation using objects and
Brian Auton
Appalachian State University
Evaluating Register Assignment Strategies on Out-of-Order Issue Superscalar Processor
Kevin Arnold and Andrew Seidl
Kalamazoo College
Footsteps into the Future: Revising the Introduction to Computer Science Course Using Web Pages to Teach Programming Concepts
Jason Tedor and Patrick Race
University of Alaska at Fairbanks
Sycon Team B: Reasoning With Environmental Data Sets
 
  5th ACM International Student Research Contest 1997

Sponsors: SIGCAS, SIGCSE, SIGPLAN, SIGARCH, and the ACM Membership Activities Board
Coordinators: Ben Calloni, Texas Tech University, calloni@cs.coe.ttu.edu

1997 - Graduate Division
Xin Chen and Milind Buddhikot
Washington University
Jim Jansen
United States Military Academy
Angelique Crane
Utah State University

1997 - Undergraduate Division

Ravipal Soin and Gokulnath Sathiacama
University of Southern California

James Blum
Alma College

Jeff Haidet
Denison University
 
  4th ACM International Student Research Contest 1996

Coordinator: Suzy Gallagher, University of Texas at Austin, suzy@cs.utexas.edu
* - Obs.:In 1996 Winners were not ranked 1st, 2nd and 3rd.

1996 - Graduate Division
* Lorrie Cranor
Washington University
* Mark Gilbert
Sacred Heart University
* Gar Doneckar
Villanova University
* Ragi Venkatesan
Drexel University

1996 - Undergraduate Division
* Sandra Esler
Loyola University
*

John Calloway
Northeast Oklahoma State University

*

Shariq Khan
Temple University

* Jason Triplat
University of Wisconsin
 
  3rd ACM International Student Research Contest 1995

Coordinator: Suzy Gallagher, University of Texas at Austin, suzy@cs.utexas.edu

1995 - Graduate Division
Mario Guimaraes
Advisor: Carlos Jose P.de Lucena
P.U.C. -  Rio de Janeiro
An Intelligent Software Environment for Learning Introductory Algorithms
Pinar Kinikoglu, Yakup Kinikoglu 
Advisor: A. Kathleen Hennessey
Texas Tech University
Object-Oriented Modeling of Distance Learning Delivery System
Dennis Lovie
Advisor: Kasi Periyasamy
University of Manitoba
Behavioral Study of a Graphical User Interface for a CASE Tool

1995 - Undergraduate Division
J. Stan Mason
Advisor: E. Dennis Hawthorne
Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania
Signal Processing Applications in Music

Matthew Mengerink
The University of Texas at Austin
A Collision Avoidance Simulation in Associative Broadcast

Angela Pochiluk, Aroon Gursahaney, Chris Bruzzi
Villanova University
Layout Appropriateness
 
  2nd ACM International Student Research Contest 1994

Coordinator: Sally Goldman, Washington University, sg@cs.wustl.edu

1994 - Graduate Division
Ben Calloni
Texas Tech
BACCII: Iconic Programming for Teaching CS 1
Sanjiva Weerawarana
Advisor: Elias Houstis Purdue University
PDE Lab: A Framework for Building Problem Solving Environments
Raju Pandey
Advisor: James Browne
University of Texas at Austin A Compositional Model for Concurrent Programming
HM Gagan Gupta
Advisor: Chaitali Chakrabarti Arizona State University
VLSI Architectures for Hierarchical Block Matching Algorithms

1994 - Undergraduate Division
Marshall Veach
Advisor: James Abello
Texas A&M
Visibility Graphs: An Approach on the Blocking Vertices

Robert Kaye
California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo
Spline Cylinders

Christopher Colebourn
Advisor: Ingrid Russell
University of Hartford
Comparisons of Adaptive Resonance Theory and Backpropogation Neural Network Paradigm
HM Aditya Bhasin
Hamilton College
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrum Prediction Using 
Neural Network
 
  1st ACM International Student Research Contest 1993

Coordinator: Sally Goldman, Washington University, sg@cs.wustl.edu

1993 - Graduate Division
Sanjeev Sharma, Natalie Price, and Charles Wright
Advisor: Norman Soong
Villanova University
Virtual Botanical Laboratory
Elmamoun Babiker and Hiroko Fujihara
Texas A&M
Qualitative/Fuzzy Approach to Document Recognition
William Shaouy
Florida Atlantic University
MAPLE: A Knowledge-based System for Computer-aided Music Composition
HM Scott Finnerty
Advisor: Sujeet Shenoi
University of Tulsa
Toward a Query Language for Fuzzy Relational Databases

1993 - Undergraduate Division
Kelly Campbell, David Chappell, Joe Magura, and Shay Woodward
North Carolina State University
Simulation for NTSC Compatible High Definition Television,

Bruce Artman, Todd Eigenschink, Dave Goodman, Joel Klein, and Andy McConnell
Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
Prizm Toy Box

Aaron Spencer and Tom Whaley
Advisor: Terry Grygiel
State University of New York at Genezeo
HM Mark Goddard, Toon Wah Ong, Nathanael Tuggy
Non-student authors: Timothy Diller, Brian Kuyatt, William Jordan and Eric Schaberg
Taylor University
Automated Scoring of Hematopoietic Colonies



California State University
Rosta Farzan


Although the ability to use Unix is a necessary prerequisite, many computer science (CS) students have little or no prior experience in Unix before they enter college. I am developing an online Unix tutorial in the form of a meta-tutorial that will accomplish two goals: 1) help students understand Unix concepts and how to make use of online resources, and 2) remove some of the barriers that impede equity in computer science programs.

California State University
Lalitha Balasubramanian, Ravikarthik Sivaswamy, Kalagee Shah
Generating Efficient Test Cases from UML Use Cases


Software testing is one of the most difficult phases of the software development life cycle. Test case selection is a challenging area in the testing field. The aim of the paper is to develop an effective approach in generating efficient test cases from UML use cases. Our approach will be validated through two case studies, which will show how the input domain is optimized, and software requirements are effectively tested.

George Washington University
Arwa Al-Aama
Vigilance in Safety Critical Monitoring Systems


This research defines Safety-Critical Monitoring Systems (SCMSs) as automated systems where critical complex data is monitored for many hours by human operators in order to avoid some hazard. The research identifies vigilance as a major contributing factor to the overall safety of SCMSs. It offers a Vigilance Taxonomy which includes factors that affect human vigilance, their effect, and their references in the literature, if available. The Taxonomy is aimed to serve in identifying new opportunities for researchers and in guiding designers towards more vigilance supportive systems. The research later provides an exemplary prove of how the Taxonomy can be used.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Vibhav Rangarajan, Kevin Wilson, and Neal Checka
Source Separation using Audio-Video Sensor Fusion


One goal of a pervasive computing environment is to allow the user to interact in a natural way with the computer. The use of spoken commands is a natural way for humans to interact with many systems. In order to avoid the use of extra equipment for each user, a microphone array can be used to steer to certain locations in the room. The existence of multiple speakers or large interfering signals requires advanced beamforming techniques which attempt to separate the source from the rest of the signal. In this paper, a method based on two such techniques, adaptive and geometric, is developed for source separation in a pervasive computing environment.

Sam Houston State University
Dino Turino Setiawan
Project Erasmus: An Implementation of Online Dynamic Multimedia Tutorial


Project Erasmus is a project to display and to store a variety of multimedia data. The current implementation is to simulate an electronic library, which contains many books, mostly to simplify the hierarchy and the visualization of the problems. The concept of books explains the break down of chapter, page, image, video, and sounds. A remote client can view the electronic book after inquiry, and can store data at the server in an XML format. XML hierarchy attribute explains the functionality of the data. The advantage of project the final result is dynamic, which can be change at any moment from the database.

State University of New York at Buffalo
Philip R. Ventura, Jr.
On the Origins of Programmers: Identifying Predictors of Success for an Objects-First CS1


In 2001 the IEEE/ACM Joint Task Force on Computing Curricula legitimized the teaching of object-oriented programming in the introductory course sequence, termed objects-first. This research looks at an instance of the objects-first approach. It details how an objects-first approach might look. The research examines, through scientific analysis, various predictors of success for an objects-first approach and compares results with more traditional imperative-first approaches.

University of California, Riverside
Jing Li
Efficient Rule-Based Haplotyping Algorithms for Pedigree Data


We study haplotype reconstruction under the Mendelian law of inheritance and the minimum recombination principle on pedigree data. We prove that the problem of finding a minimum-recombinant haplotype configuration (MRHC) is in general NP-hard. This is the first complexity result concerning the problem to our knowledge. An iterative algorithm based on blocks of consecutive resolved marker loci (called block-extension) is proposed. It is very efficient and can be used for large pedigrees with a large number of markers, especially for those data sets requiring few recombinants (or recombination events). A polynomial-time exact algorithm for haplotype reconstruction without recombinants is also presented. This algorithm first identifies all the constraints based on the Mendelian law and the zero recombinant assumption, and then enumerates all possible consistent haplotype configurations. We have tested the block-extension algorithm on simulated data generated on three pedigree structures. The results show that the algorithm performs very well on both multi-allelic and biallelic data, especially when the number of recombinants is small.



Carleton College
Sebastian Celis
Weka-Parallel: Machine Learning in Parallel


We present Weka-Parallel, which is a modification to Weka, a popular machine learning software package. Weka-Parallel expands upon the original program by allowing one to perform n-fold cross-validation in parallel. This added parallelism causes Weka-Parallel to demonstrate a significant speed increase over Weka. Weka-Parallel is designed for the researcher who needs to do intense cross-validation calculations and wishes to transparently and simply harness the power of multiple computers. All the details of cross-validation, result aggregation, and multiprocessor communication are completely handled by Weka-Parallel.

The College of New Jersey
Jessie Burger
Experimental Determination of Size of Data Sets for Support Vector Machine Classification


There has been much mathematical discussion of the necessary size of data sets for support vector machines. There is little published experimentation comparing the classification accuracy of support vector machines created by various sized data sets. This paper discusses such an experiment to determine the number of vectors and the number of attributes needed to create an accurate classifier. The most important aspect of a training set is the balance between positive and negative vectors. A fairly accurate support vector machine can be created using both few vectors and few attributes if the training set is balanced.

Duquesne University
Michael Piatek
An Analysis of Flow Identification in QoS Systems


The increasing reliance on network services at large organizations has prompted administrators to seek means of ensuring resource availability for critical applications. Although several commercial offerings are presently effective, they cannot guarantee performance in the long term because of a serious vulnerability in their underlying architecture. We present a scalable, computationally practical method of masking the protocol structure of any network data through a modified encryption technique. This procedure renders traffic invisible to current real time classification techniques.

Furman University
Michael D. Elder
Distributed STrategy-Oriented Recursive Messaging System (Distributed STORMS): A Platform for Rapid Java-based Distributed Application Development on Beowulf-class Supercomputers


The design and implementation of cluster-based distributed applications can be daunting for the uninitiated. Distributed STORMS provides a reusable platform for rapidly developing cluster-based distributed applications using Java and the Extensible Modeling Language (XML). It provides for the development of pluggable, reusable Java components which can be molded into XML-based instruction lists. Once formed, these components are organized into recursive messaging hierarchies for improved performance. The result is a system which allows users familiar with Java, but new to distributed development, to experiment with minimal development time and effort.

Furman University
Jon Wyrick
ENTITY: A Component Software Architecture For Developing Scientific Simulations


I have developed a new architecture that I call ENTITY for writing applications. It makes use of Java reflection and the JavaBean API in order to wrap around program components and make them a live part of the application framework. Using ENTITY I have written an application called JavaWave that allows scientists to interactively "wire up" simulations of atmospheric models and then visualize the results. JavaWave will soon be released to the NASA-TIMED satellite team for analysis of data from the TIMED satellite mission.

Hope College
Agata Bugaj, Lilyana Mihalkova, and Donald Porter
Using Java to Teach Networking Concepts With a Programmable Network Sniffer


In a networking class, it can be difficult to master the subject matter without an opportunity for "hands-on" experimentation, such as examining a network and interpreting the applications and protocols running across it. NetSpy is a platform for packet sniffing whose unique features make it excellent for classroom use. NetSpy captures packet data and organizes it in an intuitive object-oriented manner. It abstracts the details and allows users to define packet filters as well as their own modules for network data analysis. NetSpy's GUI has been specifically designed to allow NetSpy to be used on a hand-held device.

Hope College
Alexander A. Sherstov
Streamlining Distributed Application Development


DisViz is a general-purpose lightweight execution environment for distributed applications that provides easy-to-use facilities for distributed scheduling and execution control. DisViz is equipped with an extensive utility library supporting peer-to-peer connections, unicast/broadcast messaging, and distributed synchronization. DisViz supports applications in such diverse areas as hardware simulation and testing, distributed AI simulations, and visualization of distributed computation. Among DisViz's major assets are versatile functionality, extensive failure-handling facilities, high performance (as measured by processing efficiency, bandwidth usage, and responsiveness), ease of use, scalability, and portability.

St. Edward's University
Melissa Y. Zavala
Can Genetic Programming Techniques Improve the Performance of Multicast Routing Algorithms?


Based on concepts from the biological sciences, genetic programming techniques have been used to create more efficient algorithms in many areas of computing. In my research, I applied genetic programming techniques to the problem of creating a multicast routing tree. I compared my modified algorithm against two other well known multicast routing algorithms. Results indicate an increase in speed but a marked decrease in accuracy. Complete details on this project may be found at http://acad.stedwards.edu/~mzavala/4247.

Southwestern University
Ryan Smith
Functional Ham


The problem that I addressed was to implement a generalized Hamming encoder and decoder in a functional programming language. The program is able to encode a 2^n-n-1 bit binary number into a 2^n bit binary codeword using a slight variation on the original Hamming coding scheme; it can also decode any 2^n bit binary word, and correct single errors and detect dual errors. The code works for any n>2.

University of Alabama, Birmingham
Musawir Ali Shah
Learning and Generalizing Foraging Mechanisms Through Bio-inspired Neural Synaptic Darwinism


Adaptive learning is a very important part of artificial intelligence. The ability of an agent to explore and adapt to its surroundings, adjusting itself in the process is a helpful aspect which can lead to automated terrain examination (for example) and such other practical applications. In common practicality, the theory of adaptive learning can be applied to creating self sustained machines which can be set to do a specific task without manual input at each stage of the course. This study combines adaptive learning and the generalization of foraging and survival methods by emulating the biological neural system. In the study, a naive agent is placed on a map (habitat), which consists of white-spaces (spots on the map where the agent can move to), obstacles, and nutrition sources. The agent will develop an understanding of its habitat, and will begin to exhibit intelligent behavior by applying different foraging techniques; moving towards nutrition sources when the need arises, or exploring un-explored parts of the map when its energy is at an optimal level.

University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Nathan Wells
Development of the Self-Calibrating Palmer Drought Severity Index


The Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) is one of the standard methods used in quantifying drought conditions. It has several inherent problems, all caused by the use of empirical constants in the algorithm for computing the index, that result in the inability to compare the index spatially. The Self-Calibrating PDSI is a refinement of the PDSI that does not use any empirical constants. In their place, values are dynamically calculated to calibrate the behavior of the index based on location specific historical climate data. The result is that the Self-Calibrated PDSI behaves consistently and predictably at any location.

University of Northern Iowa
Ryan Dixon
Fontango: A Tool for Creating Personal Fonts from Handwriting


Fontango is a font creation tool designed for Mac OS X and based on Apple's Cocoa frameworks. The goal of this project is to produce an application capable of converting human handwriting into a computer-based font; a program that is able to emulate the random nature of human writing. Current research includes investigations into curve approximation, data input, data extrapolation, graph optimization, and human-computer interaction.

University of Wales, Aberystwyth
Wayne Ellis
Capturing Collaborative Designs to Assist the Pedagogical Process


Growing research shows that the pedagogical process of Object Oriented Programming is flawed, with an average failure rate of as much as 30% of freshman unable to grasp OOAD concepts. Many Universities use Integrated Development Environments (IDEs) to assist novice programmers, yet studies show that IDEs are possibly making things worse. My research involves building an IDE(VorteX) to assist freshman students in their understanding of the concepts of OOAD and at the same time captures every action performed by the student. In this way we can both study the evolution of a student's design and ultimately use case-based reasoning to allow VorteX to provide freshman with automated assistance.

University of Wales, Aberystwyth
Jonathan Holloway
Development of a Managed Learning Environment by Students for Students


TWEEK is a managed learning environment that is both platform and system independent and designed to be a completely modular learning environment that is secure, robust and above all inter-operatable with other MLE systems. Developed by students for students in a university environment it is designed to be a completely innovative environment that closely models the e-learning experience. It incorporates the advantages of the current learning process whilst eliminating many of the disadvantages such as accessibility and distance learning.



Peter Sanderson, Otterbein University
Anne Gates Applin, University of Southern Mississippi
Ian Utting, University of Kent at Canterbury
Joe Hollingsworth, Indiana University, Southeast
Dennis Bouvier, St. Louis University
Aaron Gordon, Metropolitan State College of Denver
Dan Joyce, Villanova University
Mark Lewin, Microsoft Research
David J. Barnes, University of Kent at Canterbury
Ellen Walker, Hiram College
Lynda Thomas, University of Wales, Aberystwyth
Doug Baldwin, State University of New York, Geneseo
Larry Merkle, Rose-Hulman University
Judy Williams, William Penn University
Chris Milner, University of Virginia
Russell May, Morehead State University
Martha McCormick, Jacksonville State University
Cate Sheller, Kirkwood Community College
Jim Arman, Columbus School for Girls
Jody Paul, Metropolitan State College of Denver
Dorothy Deremer, Montclair State University
Clark Archer, Mount Union College
Jack Rehder, University of Waterloo
Jasmin Chadha, University of South Carolina, Spartanburg
Andrew Staugaard, College of the Ozarks
T. LaVonne Manning, University of D.C.
Robert Moutante, Bloomsburg University
Gail T. Finley, University of D.C.
Steven Cooper, Saint Joseph's University
Mark Ratcliffe, University of Wales, Aberystwyth
Gloria Melara, California State University, Northridge
Mark Bailey, Hamilton College
Prabhaker Matetii, Wright State University